Building a Shed with Old Doors



I began September by working on a project to extend the eaves of my workshop so that the snow wouldn't settle at the foundation and flood the shop in the spring anymore.

Since my goal is to clean out all the scrap materials I've been hoarding storing in the shop, I decided to build awnings over the shop windows.  That fell apart pretty quickly when I realized the windows were not properly framed out.  Obviously they had been an add-on installed by someone who had no idea about framing.

That project became a lean-to shed instead.  (I've always been a fly-by-the-seat-of-my-pants kinda girl LOL!).  I had 7 old doors in my shed of various sizes and shapes and I thought they would make excellent siding, so I got cracking building a frame to attach all the doors to.



I used up 2x4s, 2x6s, plywood, pressure treated wood, old doors, old windows and anything else I could lay my hands on to build what I now refer to as my little crooked shed.  It is completely free standing but I didn't properly level the pallets I built the shed on, so it leans toward the shop.  GAH!

I don't recommend anyone follow my technique, it was a mishmash thanks to all the scraps I used and tried to fit into the job.  On the bright side, it doesn't look too bad now that it is all painted.  On the down side, this took way too much time to put together and more ingenuity than I wanted to invest...

Here are all the photos, prepare yourselves for some really ugly looking stuff.


Above are the sides framed according to a This Old House trash can shed video I found.  You can see the failed awning project on the other window with the poor, forlorn bracket hanging on for dear life.  The pallets are heavy duty ones that are used for transporting very heavy materials.  These suckers are sturdy!!



See how the fronts are framed?  Two 2x4s with a space left on the front 2x4 for the crosspiece. The back crosspiece is attached the same way only the 2x4 brace is attached on the flat side to the side piece because the back crosspiece is a double 2x6 header.  There are also 2x4 braces added above and below the center crosspieces all the way around but I forgot to take a photo.

I slapped a sheet of plywood across the back while I still had access to do so.  It is a 3/4" 4x8 sheet so it helped to square things up and hold things together.


I didn't take as many photos as I intended to.  Here is the shed with as many doors and parts of doors attached as I could slap in place.   The front was framed on the ground and then stood up and nailed in place.  You can't use screws for framing, they are too brittle and tend to break at the head which leaves you with some sketchy support.  3 1/2" nails are the way to go.  My arm still aches.



The roof is just 2x6s that I laid flat because I had no room to stand them on edge thanks to tucking the shed under the eaves of the shop.  They're not as strong as they should be, but I spaced them close together to make up for it.  Here the roofing is just laid on top because I didn't have time to cut it until the following weekend.


I hemmed and hawed over what to do for a door since all I had were 24" wide doors and I wanted a 34" opening.  I decided to install the last 24" door I had and come up with another solution for the other 10".

I built a 10" wide board and batten shutter and installed it with hinges on one side of the opening.



   I left the old door hardware on to give me a friction fit close.  This is what I mean:


Because the latchbolt is spring loaded, it holds the shutter and the door tightly together.  I don't have to do anything more to keep the doors closed.  



I still need a bit of trim above the doors to tidy it up.   A bit of tarpaper and some metal roofing and my shed is done!  on the outside anyway.  I have big plans for the inside to be carried out next summer.  


For the awning side, I propped an old door underneath the bracket to give it more support and I attached another old door to the side of the shop with 2x4s.  Then I added some crosspieces and support pieces with  a 3/4" 4x8 sheet of plywood for the roof.  More tarpaper and tin roofing and I'm satisfied that the roof will keep the wet away from the foundation of my shop.

I'm disappointed that I ran out of time for trimming and painting, but I lucked out with our super long warm fall weather.

 Here's how the whole thing looks now:


There's a lot more painting and trimming up to be done, but for this winter I have no worries about my shop flooding come springtime!

UPDATE:

I found another window door that I used to balance the look of the shed.  Check out the new look!




If you'd like to check out some of my other outdoor projects, click on this photo:



Happy creating!



With a small budget, big dreams and a love of a challenge, Anne blogs about renovating and decorating her tiny 1930s bungalow. A self-taught artist and professed power tool lover, she enjoys writing, gardening, photography, nature and diy'ing. And she's never met a dumpster she didn’t want to root through! Come along for the ride!!




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41 comments:

  1. That is really cool, Anne. I like how you used all the doors, they fit together so well, very creative!

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  2. It's amazing how you made all your old doors and boards fit together. I really love the charm of the finished (or as finished as it is in this post) project.

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  3. It looks spectacular, Anne! And, I love how the old doors are fitted together like a puzzle. You are so clever! I don't know if you have Home Depot, but they sell re-useable "sandbags". There is no sand in them, it is some sort of absorbent material inside that they go from flat to fill. You can lay them out empty where the water problem is and they will soak up the water. If they don't dry out between rains, that's okay. They will work like a dam. Amazing they are, and they absorb more water than sandbags, so they may be great to have on hand. When you are done, dry them out and put them away for the next time. They fold up flat like a pillowcase. Mine dried out in the spring, but we have had lots of rain during the monsoon and even now and they work so well. xoxo Su

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  4. Wow, I love this too Anne! I love how you used old doors and windows and odds and ends, so cool! This is kind of the look I am envisioning for my little pergola structure in my back yard... I still haven't done anything with it so I suppose it'll wait until next year.

    Tania

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  5. Hey, Anne, that's really neat! : - )

    Well done, and so nifty and unique!!

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  6. Cute. It looks like the little sheds I see around here that have been around for decades.

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  7. You never fail to amaze me!! Love how you pieced together all the doors.....very clever and way cool!!!

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  8. What a fun way to use the old doors!

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  9. I do admire you for having done such a great job! I would never come up with an idea of building my own shed using old doors. Well done:-)

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  10. You are amazing! Your shed is adorable. I can't even begin to think how to do a project like this.

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  11. You are amazing! Your shed is adorable. I can't even begin to think how to do a project like this.

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  12. You are amazing! Your shed is adorable. I can't even begin to think how to do a project like this.

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  13. Flying by the seat of your pants works out great for you. You rocked this out!!! Love it

    Cindy

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  14. This is an amazing job! I can't believe you did all that with old doors. It looks so great once painted!

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  15. You are amazing! This is wonderful! It looks great.

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  16. Ohhhhh Anne. I am swooning. You girl hit it out of the park with this one. All those old doors and what you loved them into is just too amazing!! This is awesome, seriously awesome.
    Kris

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  17. Anne, you never cease to amaze me. This was such a creative way of using the doors and the paint pulls it all together. Love it!

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    1. Thank you very much Di! You're too kind!

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  18. Oh Anne - this is so fabulous!
    You amaze me - truly you absolutely amaze me - I can't even install a door let alone build something this incredible with a bunch of them!
    xxx

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  19. anne the seat of your pants must be gone by now you have used them a lot and always come out on top i love this shed xx

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    1. haha you're right!! Thanks so much!

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  20. You never cease to amaze me Anne with your clever ideas and tool saavy skills! Pinning to share ☺

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  21. That is awesome Anne. I love the use of the recycled doors. Too smart!

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  22. If only I could come over and hang out with you in there for tea! Not only have you made it stable and functional but it's truly charming as well, what with all the peek-a-boo windows. I can tell (I'm sure we all can) that this was hard work, but well worth it!

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  23. Wow, just wow! I saw a show on HGTV not too long ago here where they made tiny little cabins (like really tiny) and on one of the shows they made an entire wall out of old windows...and they had a crew of 5 building...and you did this all by yourself! You amaze me, truly!
    I love how it all came together with paint, I love the shutter you made to fill in the space...very creative!
    Amazing job!!

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  24. Amazing having stored so many doors, what a great way of using them! Sarah x

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  25. WOW I love your creative eye. That looks amazing!! Love all the doors, and the super cool vintage look! Can't wait to see what you do next spring to the inside!

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  26. Anne...you are amazing !!!...Cannot believe you constructed that great looking shed from doors....I do not know how you build these wonderful things all by yourself!...but then again, I am sure Max was supervising...Beautiful job!!!

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  27. This year we made a shed for my hubby, but next year I hope it will be my turn. I am hoping to finally get the potting shed of my dreams. I love the idea of reusing old doors. Thanks for the great inspiration. I love what you have done here Anne. Clever you!

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  28. that looks great!!!! I never would've thought it would look so cohesive seeing it in it's "before" state. But, after you painted everything it looks amazing! I love how you used things you already had and did this on your own.

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  29. Oh Anne... this is so over the top cool! I can't get over the things you build yourself. I want one! Featured you in this weekend's Party Junk. :) Thanks for linking up!

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  30. Oh my goodness, I love this! This was a real labor of love and the end result is amazing. Thanks so much for sharing at Vintage Inspiration Party.

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  31. Oh my goodness, I love this! This was a real labor of love and the end result is amazing. Thanks so much for sharing at Vintage Inspiration Party.

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  32. This is so cool! I love to see solid old doors put to good use. I once worked at a golfcourse that had their bar made out of old unpainted doors turned on their sides around the front of the bar. It received a lot of comments!
    Wendy

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  33. Awesome project here, and it doesn't look like your framing is going anywhere! I love the pieced together look this has. Our shed started out like this and has had 3 add-ons...lol, but hubby sided it now it's just interesting instead of quaint..I miss the quaint...Great Job! Sandi

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    1. Thanks so much Sandi! I do love that quaint look!

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  34. That is so cool Anne! I am impressed that you did all the work yourself because those blue pallets are heavy as I'm sure the doors were too. Interested fact about using nails instead of screws. After demo-ing out a few walls in our house, I noticed the huge nails to hold the framing together.

    Love your one of a kind shed. Great work as always.

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  35. Awesome, idea and love love how you used the doors.

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